Bitcoin Faucet Bot Collector 2020 Download

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Heres some proof about sigma not being a trojan and omikron client proof from the sigma creator andro

The high GPU usage is due to the GPU acceleration or the UIs. And this is not comparable to other person's GPU usage since every GPU behave differently. You can compare this usage with vanilla 1.15.2's GPU usage. In my personal case, it's about +1~8% higher.
And the overall performance loss over the 1.8 clients is due to the 1.15 itself, the heavy UI, the missing optimisations (performance update soon), the obfuscation, etc
Some people are saying that "conhost.exe" is a malware... It's actually the console process spawned by java.exe which is used by Sigma (instead of the javaw.exe, the window version of java.exe without the console, that is mostly used for Minecraft).
Fun fact: Badlion client and Lunar client are also spawning conhost, and they aren't getting called out as malwares.
Here's a great explanation of what it is: https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4996/what-is-conhost.exe-and-why-is-it-running/

And Omikron client was not a bitcoin miner, here's the copypasta :
Omikron client didn't have any btc miner / rat / botnet or whatever. The thing running in background was a system to validate the usage of the auto alt / proxy from other computers. Therefore, if you used auto alt / auto proxy, your computer among others validated in some sort of P2P the usage of alts / proxies. If >50% of computers says that a "transaction" is good, it was validated. Omikron decided to do that to counter the abuse of auto alt / auto proxy.
But ofc you could disable that autorun in Omikron Client's setting. And it was clearly written in the client that it would autorun (but no body really read it) if you use auto alts / auto proxy.
Edit, another copypasta:
I know, this is missleading. In the code, finding alts is refenrenced as "mining" them because you have this usepass combo and sometime yay ! Its a working minecraft alt ! The whole problem about all this drama is that its old code written when the client was "ghost client" and putting it in a .m file intead of .minecraft, having the package not named omikron, not using omikron domain name in the code was a good idear to prevent memory scanning cheating software such as BLSquad to find "omikron" but as you can tell it has bring more trouble that anything. You shoudn't be scared, your cpu isn't and wont be used to mine crypto or any unwanted activity and you will soon be able to chose if you want the service to run. In the next release, beside the fact that all of this was moved to .minecraft/Omikron, using proper domain name etc, you will be able to choose if you are using the client and want the background service running to find alts or if you have the client installed but not using it you will be able to disable the background service.
The video that is spreading about Omikron client is only proving that it downloads an autorun, and runs it in the background, which is intended.

Be careful of people trying to spread that Sigma could be a virus. Most of the time, they're made up by people who are clueless and don't know about what they're talking about (ex: conhost).
submitted by Vardenisss to minecraftclients [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News

What important crypto events happened last week?
Cryptocurrencies
Monero Presents New Legal Framework In Defense Of Privacy Coins
Riccardo Spagni presented the result of more than a year's work. A whitepaper titled "Anti-Money Laundering Regulation of Privacy-Enabling Cryptocurrencies" has been published. The document was conceived as a new legal framework to protect confidential coins such as Monero, Zcash, Dash, Komodo, and others.
Tether Is Moving 1 Billion More USDT Coins From TRON To Ethereum Blockchain
The total supply of coins will not change. The company carried out the swap on September 15, coordinating its actions "with a third party". In recent weeks, this is the second such stablecoin transfer between blockchains — on August 20, the issuer also moved USDT 1 billion from Tron to Ethereum. Another piece of news about Tether: USDT capitalization exceeded $15 billion, having increased by $3 billion in just a month.
Projects and Updates
Kraken Receives Licence To Establish First U.S Digital Assets Bank
The Kraken Bitcoin exchange was the first in the United States to receive the status of a special purpose depository institution (SPDI), giving it the functions of a traditional financial institution. The corresponding application of the Californian company was approved by the Wyoming Banking Council. This will allow Kraken to opt-out of third-party vendors to perform certain banking functions on its own.
Official Ethereum Proof-of-Stake Algorithm Proposal Published
Ethereum Foundation Lead Developer Danny Ryan has published the official proposal EIP-2982, which suggests the launch of Ethereum 2.0 and the transition from the Proof-of-Work consensus algorithm to Proof-of-Stake. If approved by other leading developers, it will be possible to launch Serenity, Ethereum 2.0 phase zero. Within its framework, the Beacon Chain will be activated, which will use Proof-of-Stake.
Uniswap Provides All Its Users With $1.200
Leading decentralized exchange (DEX) Uniswap has released the UNI governance token. It was listed on the Binance exchange almost immediately. About 13000 Uniswap users have already requested tokens.
Regulations
New Draft Law Suggests The European Union Is Set To Regulate Cryptocurrencies
The European Commission proposed to establish a legal framework for cryptocurrencies, security tokens, and stablecoins by analogy with the requirements for traditional financial instruments. This is stated in the Cryptocurrency Asset Markets Bill. The bill proposes to treat cryptocurrency assets like any other financial instrument. According to the European Commission, this will provide legal clarity.
Digital Assets Recognized As Securities In Nigeria
The regulator clarified that cryptocurrencies offer public alternative investment opportunities. Digital assets can be used as a medium of exchange, settlement, and accumulation. In order to protect investors from risks and not violate the integrity of the market, crypto assets must be controlled on an equal basis with securities. The main task of regulation is not to discourage the development of new technologies, but to ensure fair market competition and adherence to ethical standards.
Hacking
Japanese Crypto Exchange Sues Binance for Role in $63 Million Bitcoin Hack
The Japanese company Fisco Cryptocurrency Exchange, Inc has filed a US lawsuit against Binance Holdings Ltd., accusing it of providing a service to launder cryptocurrency stolen from the Zaif exchange in 2018. Fisco acquired Zaif in 2018 shortly after the hack. Over $9 million in stolen assets could have been funneled through Binance. The company notes that analysts were able to track the movement of all stolen $63 million to one bitcoin address. Subsequently, 1,451.7 BTC were sent from it to Binance addresses.
New Virus Attacks Microsoft SQL Database Servers For Monero Mining
Tencent's cybersecurity division has discovered a new miner virus called MrbMiner. The tactics of the virus are quite simple — the botnet scans the available IP addresses in search of Microsoft SQL servers, and if it detects such, it tries to log in under the administrator account using a brute-force password. If successful, the virus downloads the assm.exe file, which implements a reboot mechanism and creates a special account for hackers to access the server. After that, MrbMiner downloads a miner for mining the anonymous cryptocurrency Monero (XMR).
Mass adoption
Bahamas Geared to Launch Central Bank Digital Currency
The Bahamas wants to be the first country in the world to roll out a government-backed virtual currency nationwide and announced they will launch a central bank-issued cryptocurrency (CBDC) in October. The digital currency, dubbed "sand dollar", is designed to increase the financial availability of remote islands within the archipelago state.
Alibaba On Track To Be The Largest Blockchain Patent Holder By End Of 2020
Computer giant IBM risks losing the title of the largest blockchain patent holder to the Chinese corporation Alibaba. Since the beginning of the year, Alibaba has published ten times more patents than its closest competitor, IBM. According to analysts, if the pace is maintained, the Chinese corporation will become the largest patent holder by the end of the year.
France Begins Central Bank Digital Currency Testing
Société Générale — one of the largest financial conglomerates in Europe — will test the central bank digital currency (CBDC) on the Tezos blockchain. The Bank of France, as a result of the selection of partners, chose the Forge blockchain platform to test CBDC for interbank settlements. As part of the experiment, the feasibility of digitizing financial securities and the possibility of settlements on them using CBDC will be studied. In addition to Nomadic Labs, several technology service providers and consultants will participate in the testing.
Kazakhstan Will Develop A Blockchain Service For Ensuring The Security Of Personal Data
It will allow citizens of the country to control the use of their personal data. The service is planned to be introduced by the end of this year.
People
Kiss Rock Group Member Is Ready To Buy Bitcoin
Gene Simmons supported Cameron Winklevoss's request to use bank accounts to buy Bitcoin and Ether. The co-founder of Gemini tweeted that people who do not have access to banking services find it difficult to become the owners of cryptocurrency and that they need to take advantage of the benefits. The musician commented as follows: "I will. I am." For this moment, the most common opinion on Twitter is that Simmons is already buying cryptocurrency and will continue to increase the amount of Bitcoin he owns.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News

What important crypto events happened last week?
Cryptocurrencies
Monero Presents New Legal Framework In Defense Of Privacy Coins
Riccardo Spagni presented the result of more than a year's work. A whitepaper titled "Anti-Money Laundering Regulation of Privacy-Enabling Cryptocurrencies" has been published. The document was conceived as a new legal framework to protect confidential coins such as Monero, Zcash, Dash, Komodo, and others.
Tether Is Moving 1 Billion More USDT Coins From TRON To Ethereum Blockchain
The total supply of coins will not change. The company carried out the swap on September 15, coordinating its actions "with a third party". In recent weeks, this is the second such stablecoin transfer between blockchains — on August 20, the issuer also moved USDT 1 billion from Tron to Ethereum. Another piece of news about Tether: USDT capitalization exceeded $15 billion, having increased by $3 billion in just a month.
Projects and Updates
Kraken Receives Licence To Establish First U.S Digital Assets Bank
The Kraken Bitcoin exchange was the first in the United States to receive the status of a special purpose depository institution (SPDI), giving it the functions of a traditional financial institution. The corresponding application of the Californian company was approved by the Wyoming Banking Council. This will allow Kraken to opt-out of third-party vendors to perform certain banking functions on its own.
Official Ethereum Proof-of-Stake Algorithm Proposal Published
Ethereum Foundation Lead Developer Danny Ryan has published the official proposal EIP-2982, which suggests the launch of Ethereum 2.0 and the transition from the Proof-of-Work consensus algorithm to Proof-of-Stake. If approved by other leading developers, it will be possible to launch Serenity, Ethereum 2.0 phase zero. Within its framework, the Beacon Chain will be activated, which will use Proof-of-Stake.
Uniswap Provides All Its Users With $1.200
Leading decentralized exchange (DEX) Uniswap has released the UNI governance token. It was listed on the Binance exchange almost immediately. About 13000 Uniswap users have already requested tokens.
Regulations
New Draft Law Suggests The European Union Is Set To Regulate Cryptocurrencies
The European Commission proposed to establish a legal framework for cryptocurrencies, security tokens, and stablecoins by analogy with the requirements for traditional financial instruments. This is stated in the Cryptocurrency Asset Markets Bill. The bill proposes to treat cryptocurrency assets like any other financial instrument. According to the European Commission, this will provide legal clarity.
Digital Assets Recognized As Securities In Nigeria
The regulator clarified that cryptocurrencies offer public alternative investment opportunities. Digital assets can be used as a medium of exchange, settlement, and accumulation. In order to protect investors from risks and not violate the integrity of the market, crypto assets must be controlled on an equal basis with securities. The main task of regulation is not to discourage the development of new technologies, but to ensure fair market competition and adherence to ethical standards.
Hacking
Japanese Crypto Exchange Sues Binance for Role in $63 Million Bitcoin Hack
The Japanese company Fisco Cryptocurrency Exchange, Inc has filed a US lawsuit against Binance Holdings Ltd., accusing it of providing a service to launder cryptocurrency stolen from the Zaif exchange in 2018. Fisco acquired Zaif in 2018 shortly after the hack. Over $9 million in stolen assets could have been funneled through Binance. The company notes that analysts were able to track the movement of all stolen $63 million to one bitcoin address. Subsequently, 1,451.7 BTC were sent from it to Binance addresses.
New Virus Attacks Microsoft SQL Database Servers For Monero Mining
Tencent's cybersecurity division has discovered a new miner virus called MrbMiner. The tactics of the virus are quite simple — the botnet scans the available IP addresses in search of Microsoft SQL servers, and if it detects such, it tries to log in under the administrator account using a brute-force password. If successful, the virus downloads the assm.exe file, which implements a reboot mechanism and creates a special account for hackers to access the server. After that, MrbMiner downloads a miner for mining the anonymous cryptocurrency Monero (XMR).
Mass adoption
Bahamas Geared to Launch Central Bank Digital Currency
The Bahamas wants to be the first country in the world to roll out a government-backed virtual currency nationwide and announced they will launch a central bank-issued cryptocurrency (CBDC) in October. The digital currency, dubbed "sand dollar", is designed to increase the financial availability of remote islands within the archipelago state.
Alibaba On Track To Be The Largest Blockchain Patent Holder By End Of 2020
Computer giant IBM risks losing the title of the largest blockchain patent holder to the Chinese corporation Alibaba. Since the beginning of the year, Alibaba has published ten times more patents than its closest competitor, IBM. According to analysts, if the pace is maintained, the Chinese corporation will become the largest patent holder by the end of the year.
France Begins Central Bank Digital Currency Testing
Société Générale — one of the largest financial conglomerates in Europe — will test the central bank digital currency (CBDC) on the Tezos blockchain. The Bank of France, as a result of the selection of partners, chose the Forge blockchain platform to test CBDC for interbank settlements. As part of the experiment, the feasibility of digitizing financial securities and the possibility of settlements on them using CBDC will be studied. In addition to Nomadic Labs, several technology service providers and consultants will participate in the testing.
Kazakhstan Will Develop A Blockchain Service For Ensuring The Security Of Personal Data
It will allow citizens of the country to control the use of their personal data. The service is planned to be introduced by the end of this year.
People
Kiss Rock Group Member Is Ready To Buy Bitcoin
Gene Simmons supported Cameron Winklevoss's request to use bank accounts to buy Bitcoin and Ether. The co-founder of Gemini tweeted that people who do not have access to banking services find it difficult to become the owners of cryptocurrency and that they need to take advantage of the benefits. The musician commented as follows: "I will. I am." For this moment, the most common opinion on Twitter is that Simmons is already buying cryptocurrency and will continue to increase the amount of Bitcoin he owns.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to cryptoeconomynet [link] [comments]

Crypto Weekly News — September, 18

What important crypto events happened last week?

Cryptocurrencies

Monero Presents New Legal Framework In Defense Of Privacy Coins
Riccardo Spagni presented the result of more than a year's work. A whitepaper titled "Anti-Money Laundering Regulation of Privacy-Enabling Cryptocurrencies" has been published. The document was conceived as a new legal framework to protect confidential coins such as Monero, Zcash, Dash, Komodo, and others.
Tether Is Moving 1 Billion More USDT Coins From TRON To Ethereum Blockchain
The total supply of coins will not change. The company carried out the swap on September 15, coordinating its actions "with a third party". In recent weeks, this is the second such stablecoin transfer between blockchains — on August 20, the issuer also moved USDT 1 billion from Tron to Ethereum. Another piece of news about Tether: USDT capitalization exceeded $15 billion, having increased by $3 billion in just a month.

Projects and Updates

Kraken Receives Licence To Establish First U.S Digital Assets Bank
The Kraken Bitcoin exchange was the first in the United States to receive the status of a special purpose depository institution (SPDI), giving it the functions of a traditional financial institution. The corresponding application of the Californian company was approved by the Wyoming Banking Council. This will allow Kraken to opt-out of third-party vendors to perform certain banking functions on its own.
Official Ethereum Proof-of-Stake Algorithm Proposal Published
Ethereum Foundation Lead Developer Danny Ryan has published the official proposal EIP-2982, which suggests the launch of Ethereum 2.0 and the transition from the Proof-of-Work consensus algorithm to Proof-of-Stake. If approved by other leading developers, it will be possible to launch Serenity, Ethereum 2.0 phase zero. Within its framework, the Beacon Chain will be activated, which will use Proof-of-Stake.
Uniswap Provides All Its Users With $1.200
Leading decentralized exchange (DEX) Uniswap has released the UNI governance token. It was listed on the Binance exchange almost immediately. About 13000 Uniswap users have already requested tokens.

Regulations

New Draft Law Suggests The European Union Is Set To Regulate Cryptocurrencies
The European Commission proposed to establish a legal framework for cryptocurrencies, security tokens, and stablecoins by analogy with the requirements for traditional financial instruments. This is stated in the Cryptocurrency Asset Markets Bill. The bill proposes to treat cryptocurrency assets like any other financial instrument. According to the European Commission, this will provide legal clarity.
Digital Assets Recognized As Securities In Nigeria
The regulator clarified that cryptocurrencies offer public alternative investment opportunities. Digital assets can be used as a medium of exchange, settlement, and accumulation. In order to protect investors from risks and not violate the integrity of the market, crypto assets must be controlled on an equal basis with securities. The main task of regulation is not to discourage the development of new technologies, but to ensure fair market competition and adherence to ethical standards.

Hacking

Japanese Crypto Exchange Sues Binance for Role in $63 Million Bitcoin Hack
The Japanese company Fisco Cryptocurrency Exchange, Inc has filed a US lawsuit against Binance Holdings Ltd., accusing it of providing a service to launder cryptocurrency stolen from the Zaif exchange in 2018. Fisco acquired Zaif in 2018 shortly after the hack. Over $9 million in stolen assets could have been funneled through Binance. The company notes that analysts were able to track the movement of all stolen $63 million to one bitcoin address. Subsequently, 1,451.7 BTC were sent from it to Binance addresses.
New Virus Attacks Microsoft SQL Database Servers For Monero Mining
Tencent's cybersecurity division has discovered a new miner virus called MrbMiner. The tactics of the virus are quite simple — the botnet scans the available IP addresses in search of Microsoft SQL servers, and if it detects such, it tries to log in under the administrator account using a brute-force password. If successful, the virus downloads the assm.exe file, which implements a reboot mechanism and creates a special account for hackers to access the server. After that, MrbMiner downloads a miner for mining the anonymous cryptocurrency Monero (XMR).

Mass adoption

Bahamas Geared to Launch Central Bank Digital Currency
The Bahamas wants to be the first country in the world to roll out a government-backed virtual currency nationwide and announced they will launch a central bank-issued cryptocurrency (CBDC) in October. The digital currency, dubbed "sand dollar", is designed to increase the financial availability of remote islands within the archipelago state.
Alibaba On Track To Be The Largest Blockchain Patent Holder By End Of 2020
Computer giant IBM risks losing the title of the largest blockchain patent holder to the Chinese corporation Alibaba. Since the beginning of the year, Alibaba has published ten times more patents than its closest competitor, IBM. According to analysts, if the pace is maintained, the Chinese corporation will become the largest patent holder by the end of the year.
France Begins Central Bank Digital Currency Testing
Société Générale — one of the largest financial conglomerates in Europe — will test the central bank digital currency (CBDC) on the Tezos blockchain. The Bank of France, as a result of the selection of partners, chose the Forge blockchain platform to test CBDC for interbank settlements. As part of the experiment, the feasibility of digitizing financial securities and the possibility of settlements on them using CBDC will be studied. In addition to Nomadic Labs, several technology service providers and consultants will participate in the testing.
Kazakhstan Will Develop A Blockchain Service For Ensuring The Security Of Personal Data
It will allow citizens of the country to control the use of their personal data. The service is planned to be introduced by the end of this year.

People

Kiss Rock Group Member Is Ready To Buy Bitcoin
Gene Simmons supported Cameron Winklevoss's request to use bank accounts to buy Bitcoin and Ether. The co-founder of Gemini tweeted that people who do not have access to banking services find it difficult to become the owners of cryptocurrency and that they need to take advantage of the benefits. The musician commented as follows: "I will. I am." For this moment, the most common opinion on Twitter is that Simmons is already buying cryptocurrency and will continue to increase the amount of Bitcoin he owns.
That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to u/CoinjoyAssistant [link] [comments]

AMA: Ask Mike Anything

Hello again. It's been a while.
People have been emailing me about once a week or so for the last year to ask if I'm coming back to Bitcoin now that Bitcoin Cash exists. And a couple of weeks ago I was summoned on a thread called "Ask Mike Hearn Anything", but that was nothing to do with me and I was on holiday in Japan at the time. So I figured I should just answer all the different questions and answers in one place rather than keep doing it individually over email.
Firstly, thanks for the kind words on this sub. I don't take part anymore but I still visit occasionally to see what people are talking about, and the people posting nice messages is a pleasant change from three years ago.
Secondly, who am I? Some new Bitcoiners might not know.
I am Satoshi.
Just kidding. I'm not Satoshi. I was a Bitcoin developer for about five years, from 2010-2015. I was also one of the first Bitcoin users, sending my first coins in April 2009 (to SN), about 4 months after the genesis block. I worked on various things:
You can see a trend here - I was always interested in developing peer to peer decentralised applications that used Bitcoin.
But what I'm best known for is my role in the block size debate/civil war, documented by Nathaniel Popper in the New York Times. I spent most of 2015 writing extensively about why various proposals from the small-block/Blockstream faction weren't going to work (e.g. on replace by fee, lightning network, what would occur if no hard fork happened, soft forks, scaling conferences etc). After Blockstream successfully took over Bitcoin Core and expelled anyone who opposed them, Gavin and I forked Bitcoin Core to create Bitcoin XT, the first alternative node implementation to gain any serious usage. The creation of XT led to the imposition of censorship across all Bitcoin discussion forums and news outlets, resulted in the creation of this sub, and Core supporters paid a botnet operator to force XT nodes offline with DDoS attacks. They also convinced the miners and wider community to do nothing for years, resulting in the eventual overload of the main network.
I left the project at the start of 2016, documenting my reasons and what I expected to happen in my final essay on Bitcoin in which I said I considered it a failed experiment. Along with the article in the New York Times this pierced the censorship, made the wider world aware of what was going on, and thus my last gift to the community was a 20% drop in price (it soon recovered).

The last two years

Left Bitcoin ... but not decentralisation. After all that went down I started a new project called Corda. You can think of Corda as Bitcoin++, but modified for industrial use cases where a decentralised p2p database is more immediately useful than a new coin.
Corda incorporates many ideas I had back when I was working on Bitcoin but couldn't implement due to lack of time, resources, because of ideological wars or because they were too technically radical for the community. So even though it's doesn't provide a new cryptocurrency out of the box, it might be interesting for the Bitcoin Cash community to study anyway. By resigning myself to Bitcoin's fate and joining R3 I could go back to the drawing board and design with a lot more freedom, creating something inspired by Bitcoin's protocol but incorporating all the experience we gained writing Bitcoin apps over the years.
The most common question I'm asked is whether I'd come back and work on Bitcoin again. The obvious followup question is - come back and work on what? If you want to see some of the ideas I'd have been exploring if things had worked out differently, go read the Corda tech white paper. Here's a few of the things it might be worth asking about:
I don't plan on returning to Bitcoin but if you'd like to know what sort of things I'd have been researching or doing, ask about these things.
edit: Richard pointed out some essays he wrote that might be useful, Enterprise blockchains for cryptocurrency experts and New to Corda? Start here!
submitted by mike_hearn to btc [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

What's up with Brave Browser?

I've been seeing ads for Brave Browser on a number of websites, including Reddit itself. On GoogePlay, it has 10M downloads and bills itself as a no-ads privacy browser.
But when it came out years ago, I heard it was supposedly a scam that didn't really protect your privacy, while turning you into a botnet. Google tells me there is some bitcoin/ethereum connection still going on.
So why is it popular? What is the massive appeal versus Chrome, Firefox, Kiwi, Via, etc.
submitted by anonMLS to OutOfTheLoop [link] [comments]

Electrum Wallet (Bitcoin BTC) still under attack by malicious nodes & fake update messages. $4.6 million stolen so far.

Electrum DDoS botnet reaches 152,000 infected hosts
April 29, 2019
We have been closely monitoring the situation involving the continued attacks against users of the popular Electrum Bitcoin wallet. Initially, victims were being tricked to download a fraudulent update that stole their cryptocurrencies. Later on, the threat actors launched a series of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks in response to Electrum developers trying to protect their users.
Since our last blog, the amount of stolen funds has increased to USD $4.6 million, and the botnet that is flooding the Electrum infrastructure is rapidly growing. Case in point, on April 24, the number of infected machines in the botnet was just below 100,000 and the next day it reached its highest at 152,000, according to this online tracker. Since then, it has gone up and down and plateaued at around the 100,000 mark.
https://blog.malwarebytes.com/cybercrime/2019/04/electrum-ddos-botnet-reaches-152000-infected-hosts/
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/botnet-of-over-100k-devices-used-to-ddos-electrum-servers/
Older article, which explains the attack:
https://blog.malwarebytes.com/cybercrime/2019/04/electrum-bitcoin-wallets-under-siege/
Update: Johoe has a good comment (below) about staying safe while using Electrum (BTC) and Electron Cash (BCH).
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/bix0gd/electrum_wallet_bitcoin_btc_still_under_attack_by/em4hyh7/
submitted by normal_rc to btc [link] [comments]

Rapidly Growing Electrum Botnet Infects Over 152,000 Users; Steals $4.6 Million

An ongoing attack against Electrum Bitcoin wallets has just grown bigger and stronger with attackers now targeting the whole infrastructure of the exchange with a botnet of over 152,000 infected users, raising the amount of stolen users' funds to USD 4.6 million.
Electrum has been facing cyber attacks since December last year when a team of cybercriminals exploited a weakness in the Electrum infrastructure to trick wallet users into downloading the malicious versions of the software.
In brief, the attackers added some malicious servers to the Electrum peer network which were designed to purposely display an error to legitimate Electrum wallet apps, urging them to download a malicious wallet software update from an unofficial GitHub repository.
submitted by IAmPrestige to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Ransomeware Cyberattack Mega-Thread

Hi folks,
In light of the ongoing world-wide cyberattack/ransomware issue at the moment, we have decided to set up a mega-thread to contain all of the news and updates as things unfold. If you find new news or stories about the attacks, please do not submit them to the sub, please submit them here and I will periodically add the new links to a growing list. Pre-existing posts will remain but all new posts will be removed and directed here. Thank you to everyone who has posted and help spread the news so far!
EDIT: You can download the standalone update here directly from Microsoft.
SEE ALSO: /PCMasterRace discussion
(Sorted by newest first) (Updated May 15th 4PM (-8gmt))
Submitter Discussion Link
ManiaforBeatles Discussion Researchers see possible North Korea link to global cyber attack
jimrosenz Discussion Hardly Anyone Paying the Hackers? Because Using Bitcoin Is Hard
Ilikespacestuff Discussion The WannaCry ransomware has mysterious ties to North Korea
MBrandonLee Discussion The WannaCry ransomware attack was temporarily halted. But it’s not over yet.
OmahaVike Discussion Researchers: WannaCry ransomware shares code with North Korean malware - CyberScoop
swinglinefan Discussion The WannaCry Ransomware Hackers Made Some Major Mistakes
capcaunul Discussion WannaCry hackers had no intention of giving users their files back even if they pay
SuccessHook Discussion Microsoft says governments should stop 'hoarding' security vulnerabilities after WannaCry attack
zsreport Discussion WannaCry Ransomware: Microsoft Calls Out NSA For 'Stockpiling' Vulnerabilities
PCisLame Discussion Cyber attack latest: Vladimir Putin blames US for hack as thousands more computers hit by ransomware
PCisLame Discussion Worldwide ransomware attacks: What we know so far
bevmoon Discussion Worldwide cyberattack could spark more trouble Monday
marypin Discussion Microsoft’s response to widespread cyber attacks may make you WannaCry
dinesh848 Discussion What Is WannaCry, Who Is Affected, and Everything Else You Need to Know About It
destinyland Discussion Microsoft blasts spy agencies for leaked exploits used by WanaDecrypt0r
proto-sinaitic Discussion Microsoft calls out NSA, CIA for 'stockpiling of vulnerabilities' after major ransomware cyberattack
screaming_librarian Discussion Microsoft blames US Government for 'WannaCrypt' ransomware disaster
mikekavish Discussion Aftershocks May Last as U.S. Warns of Malware’s Complex Components
littleaurora Discussion If You Still Use Windows XP, Prepare For the Worst
temporarycreature Discussion Microsoft president blasts NSA for its role in 'WannaCry' computer ransom attack
PCisLame Discussion An unprecedented "ransomware" cyberattack that has already hit tens of thousands of victims in 150 countries could wreak greater havoc as more malicious variations appear and people return to their desks Monday and power up computers at the start of the workweek.
geekdad Discussion WCry/WanaCry Ransomware Technical Analysis
Blueismyfavcolour Discussion Revealed: The 22-year-old IT expert who saved the world from ransomware virus but lives for surfing
geekdad Discussion Microsoft's response to WannaCrypt
BlaqkAngel Discussion WannaCry - New Variants Detected
Greg-2012 Discussion 'Accidental hero' halts ransomware attack and warns: this is not over
Greg-2012 Discussion WannaCry ransomware: Researcher halts its spread by registering domain for $10.69
iliketechnews Discussion Global ‘Wana’ Ransomware Outbreak Earned Perpetrators $26,000 So Far
jb2386 Discussion Global ransomware cyberattack halted by a young engineer's opportunistic domain registration
mvea Discussion Defence Secretary unable to deny Trident nuclear submarines run on same outdated software hackers exploited to cripple NHS systems: 'I have complete confidence in our nuclear deterrent'
gankstar5 Discussion Cyber-attack threat escalating - Europol
Diazepam Discussion It's Not Over, WannaCry 2.0 Ransomware Just Arrived With No 'Kill-Switch'
Captain_CockSmith Discussion For $10.69, British Researcher Slows Global Cyberattack
f0li Discussion A 22-year-old spent $11 and thwarted the global cyber attack
bulldog75 Discussion Ransomware attack reveals breakdown in US intelligence protocols, expert says
ManiaforBeatles Discussion A British researcher unexpectedly found and activated a "kill switch" to an "unprecedented" ransomware cyberattack that hit hundreds of thousands of computers around the globe at hospitals, government offices, transportation systems and major companies, including FedEx.
LazyProspector Discussion Global cyber-attack: Security blogger halts ransomware 'by accident'
f0li Discussion How to Accidentally Stop a Global Cyber Attacks
PCisLame Discussion Edward Snowden points blame at NSA for not preventing NHS cyber attack
ppumkin Discussion NHS Hit by Ransomware.. and many others too!
viperex Discussion A Massive Ransomware 'Explosion' Is Hitting Targets All Over the World
Mattroeing Discussion Cyber attack spreads across 74 countries; some UK hospitals crippled
Lettershort Discussion Microsoft patches Windows XP to fight 'WannaCrypt' attacks
Doener23 Discussion 'Accidental hero' finds kill switch to stop spread of ransomware cyber-attack
gumgum_bazuka Discussion UK hospitals hit with massive ransomware attack
mikekavish Discussion Wanna Decryptor: what is the NSA 'atom bomb of ransomware' behind the NHS attack?
FortuitousAdroit Discussion Player 3 Has Entered the Game: Say Hello to 'WannaCry'
FortuitousAdroit Discussion Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks; Microsoft releases WannaCrypt protection for out-of-support products Windows XP, Windows 8, & Windows Server 2003
middleeastnewsman Discussion NHS cyber-attack: Amber Rudd says lessons must be learnt
FortuitousAdroit Discussion 'Accidental hero' finds kill switch to stop spread of ransomware cyber-attack
campuscodi Discussion Microsoft Releases Patch for Older Windows Versions to Protect Against Wana Decrypt0r
_JCDK Discussion PSA: Kill switch for WannaCry found and active.
bevmoon Discussion Researcher finds 'kill switch' for cyberattack ransomeware
HaroldSmith_1 Discussion Malware, from NSA documents, hacks computers worldwide
FortuitousAdroit Discussion Huge Ransomware Attack Spreads Across Globe: What to Do
jimmyradola Discussion Major Cyber-Attack Hits NHS - Hackers Demand Ransom £233
maxwellhill Discussion NSA Tools, Built Despite Warnings, Used in Global Cyber Attack
tellman1257 Discussion Full coverage of the massive ransomware attacks that hit hospitals across the world today, May 12, 2017 (Click the downward arrow to the left of "More" to see all headlines and tweets)
littleaurora Discussion Update your Windows systems now. Right now.
FortuitousAdroit Discussion Wcrypt 'ransom ware' infections over the last 24 hours
stupidstupidreddit Discussion Global extortion cyberattack hits dozens of nations
FortuitousAdroit Discussion Leaked NSA Malware Is Helping Hijack Computers Around the World
Imnaha2 Discussion Massive Global Ransomware Attack Underway, Patch Available
BauerHouse Discussion Massive ransomware cyber-attack hits 74 countries around the world
eye_josh Discussion What We Know and Don't Know About the International Cyberattack, NYT Live updates
Lighting Discussion Massive Malware Cyberattack Hits English Hospitals, FedEx. Attackers demand bitcoin.
aaron7897 Discussion Massive ransomware attack hits 74 countries
rafaelloaa Discussion Malware, described in leaked NSA documents, cripples computers worldwide
callcybercop Discussion Ransomware infections reported worldwide
PHPiyan Discussion NHS cyber-attack: GPs and hospitals hit by ransomware - BBC News
nowhathappenedwas Discussion Apparent NSA tools behind massive hospital ransomware attacks around the world
I_have_no_mercy Discussion Cyberattacks in 12 Nations Said to Use Leaked N.S.A. Hacking Tool
thatshirtman Discussion Ransomware infections reported worldwide
ancsunamun Discussion WannaCrypt0r Ransomware Using NSA Exploit Leaked by Shadow Brokers Is on a Rampage
stupidstupidreddit Discussion English hospitals divert ambulances after 'ransomware' cyber attack
Bevmoon Discussion Hospitals across England hit by ransomware cyber attack, systems knocked offline
Imnaha2 Discussion WCry ransomware explodes in massive distribution wave
paradiselost79 Discussion NHS England hit by 'cyber attack'
sidcool1234 Discussion NHS hospitals hit by cyber attack 'creeping' across England
Henderino Discussion NHS England hit by 'cyber attack'
LUXURY_COMMUNISM_NOW Discussion NHS cyber attack: Large-scale hack forces hospitals across England to divert emergency patients
I_have_no_mercy Discussion Cyberattacks in 12 Nations Said to Use Leaked N.S.A. Hacking Tool
Grepnork Discussion Hospitals across England hit by large-scale cyber-attack
TheoDW Discussion Spanish companies hit by ransomware cyber attack
submitted by abrownn to technology [link] [comments]

Cryptojacking Malware Devs Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison

Group leader Bogdan Nicolescu and co-conspirator Radu Miclaus were sentenced to 20 and 18 years respectively after being found guilty on 21 different counts of wire fraud, money laundering aggravated identity theft and other crimes, a press release announced Friday. The gang was also accused of developing malware which mined bitcoin and monero using their host computers' processing power.
Tiberiu Danet, a third Bayrob Group member, pleaded guilty in Nov. 2018 to eight charges. His sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 8.
From its founding in 2007 to its members’ apprehension and eventual extradition in late 2016, the Bayrob Group, which operated out of Bucharest, Romania, ran a sprawling hacking and malware operation. They deployed trojan malware in seemingly mundane emails from well-known companies and groups, but when victims attempted to download attachments apparently from Norton, the IRS and Western Union, their computers instead became infected with the Bayrob botnet, according to an indictment.
The botnet allowed its Romanian handlers to steal $4 million total, prosecutors claimed.
The botnet also installed crypto mining software, according to the July 2016 indictment. And it was not discreet; the Bitcoin and Monero mining operation hogged hosts’ processing power.
“Once a bot was instructed to mine for cryptocurrency, much of its processing speed and power would be unavailable to its legitimate owner.”
Bayrob also scanned for and transferred ownership of victims’ crypto wallets, if they had one.
submitted by SilkChain to u/SilkChain [link] [comments]

Cryptojacking Malware Devs Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison

Group leader Bogdan Nicolescu and co-conspirator Radu Miclaus were sentenced to 20 and 18 years respectively after being found guilty on 21 different counts of wire fraud, money laundering aggravated identity theft and other crimes, a press release announced Friday. The gang was also accused of developing malware which mined bitcoin and monero using their host computers' processing power.
Tiberiu Danet, a third Bayrob Group member, pleaded guilty in Nov. 2018 to eight charges. His sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 8.
From its founding in 2007 to its members’ apprehension and eventual extradition in late 2016, the Bayrob Group, which operated out of Bucharest, Romania, ran a sprawling hacking and malware operation. They deployed trojan malware in seemingly mundane emails from well-known companies and groups, but when victims attempted to download attachments apparently from Norton, the IRS and Western Union, their computers instead became infected with the Bayrob botnet, according to an indictment.
The botnet allowed its Romanian handlers to steal $4 million total, prosecutors claimed.
The botnet also installed crypto mining software, according to the July 2016 indictment. And it was not discreet; the Bitcoin and Monero mining operation hogged hosts’ processing power.
“Once a bot was instructed to mine for cryptocurrency, much of its processing speed and power would be unavailable to its legitimate owner.”
Bayrob also scanned for and transferred ownership of victims’ crypto wallets, if they had one.
submitted by SilkChain to SilkNews [link] [comments]

Rapidly Growing Electrum Botnet Infects Over 152,000 Users; Steals $4.6 Million

An ongoing attack against Electrum Bitcoin wallets has just grown bigger and stronger with attackers now targeting the whole infrastructure of the exchange with a botnet of over 152,000 infected users, raising the amount of stolen users' funds to USD 4.6 million.
Electrum has been facing cyber attacks since December last year when a team of cybercriminals exploited a weakness in the Electrum infrastructure to trick wallet users into downloading the malicious versions of the software.
In brief, the attackers added some malicious servers to the Electrum peer network which were designed to purposely display an error to legitimate Electrum wallet apps, urging them to download a malicious wallet software update from an unofficial GitHub repository.
submitted by IAmPrestige to hacking [link] [comments]

Yay we are making money! What's next?

The past couple of months, especially the last week, has been pretty euphoric for the price of our green coin. In this post I want to attempt to explain how we got here, where we are now and what's next. Tell me if I missed something, or if my interpretation of what happened (or what is to come) is not how you see things. Obviously this is all my personal opinion, I hope it will start a healthy discussion about the future of the coin and it's community!
How we got here
To explain the recent bull run we have to look back a couple of months. Vertcoin implemented segwit and was one of the first coins to complete an atomic swap. Personally this was the first time I heard of the coin, after reading around for a bit I didn't think too much of it; “oh an other Bitcoin clone with some extra gimmicks, cool.” Obviously there would be a spike in price because of the attention, but I didn't yet realize what potential the coin had or what made it unique. Judging by the price action I wasn't the only one. The community seemed nice and ASIC resistance seemed like a smart hedge against the bigger PoW coins, but a small coin is still a small coin. Who knows what happens next right? Well some of you did...
Skip forward a few months and the whole Segwit2x debate starts to get more and more serious and uncertainty about the future market starts to grow. I don't want to get into a debate about this one. Simply because there doesn't seem to be any genuine debate about it at all. It feels like the whole debacle devolved in both parties regurgitating their talking points and pointing out how the opposing side is lying/power hungry/satan himself. What did bother me quite a bit (bit! Get it?) was the fact that market forces was pretty much left out of this discussion. Which is a bad sign to me. Ideology and principle is fine and all, but we have to go with what works, not with what is forced the hardest. We are talking about creating an alternative currency to fiat based on neutrality principle, how is market mechanism not the main tool?! Well that's where the ASIC centralization rears it's head. This whole debacle wouldn't have gone this far if mining power was spread evenly, if both parties can't agree they can split up and start their own project. Now we have 2 parties that are straight up hostile towards each other and the normal user can either join one party or watch from the sideline. This is where I started to look for alternatives for Bitcoin because I was done with the whole centralization problem. At first I moved in to Litecoin, but this coin is actually as centralized, or even more, as Bitcoin is. All though I love that community and the hard work the developers put in, hell vertcoin wouldn't be here without them, I couldn't get over the idea that Litecoin now might be a good alternative for what I want in a coin, but it isn't this way because the users demanded it, it's this way because the miners allow it to be. This is (obviously) the point I bought Vertcoin, the whole ASIC resistance thing started to make a whole lot of sense all of a sudden.
Where we are now
I'm guessing the most recent bull run didn't start because of these events, the Ledger adaptation seemed to be the main initial driver. People were reminded that Vertcoin existed and most probably realized that Ledger exposure means more price action. This exposure did create awareness about the ASIC resistance part. The timing is almost perfect though, the whole segwit FUD starts to reach new highs, alt market goes down and the people who lost confidence in the Bitcoin project start to look for alternatives, and Vertcoin says hello.
This massive bull run might not be close to done yet, considering the general uncertainty in the rest of the cryptomarket. Vertcoin, at the moment, is a good hedge against ASIC coins while other alts are sinking. The momentum now reminds me of the insane run ANS/NEO had a while back. At a certain point more and more people notice this coin that just keeps making massive gains, has a solid foundation, a low price and a relative small market cap. It's not unthinkable this run will keep going during this FUD month, I would absolutely not be surprised if Vertcoin hits top 20 within a month because of this, but there will be a correction. Especially if this run keeps going, it will mean more people buy Vertcoin to profit short term instead of buying it for it's long term potential.
So... What's next?
I think this is the beauty of Vertcoin. Since we are ASIC resistant it means everyone can profit from mining, which mean EVERYONE should mine. I'd like to compare Vertcoin's method to an other ASIC resistant coin, Monero. Monero shares this part of the philosophy, the coin should be by the people, for the people. BUT, the Monero mining isn't the easiest to get into. It's mostly a tech savvy and highly ideological motivated crowd. This group isn't that adverse to put in the effort to mine. However, this is not the target group Vertcoin aims for, Vertcoin seems to go for more general adaptation. This is where Vertcoin shines, the one click miner makes it easy for the beginner to mine for themselves. It's still in beta, it's not as easy as it could be and AMD videocards aren't optimized yet, but this will all happen. Most people reading this, especially through this wall of text, will have little qualm with starting to mine Vertcoin at it's current state. Soon it will be easy enough to let mom and pop do it too! I highly encourage people to spread the word on this and start mining, because we simply need it. Last time I checked were are on 2 Thash/s, which compared to other cryptos isn't that much. Think of it like the old days of P2P downloading (member Napster and KaZaa? I member). Those networks don't work if no one seeds, our network isn't secure if people don't mine. The plus is, this time you actually get paid for participating!
ASIC resistance has some other advantages and some disadvantages we shouldn't ignore. The Monero crowd realized that mining could be implemented on sites as an alternative to ads, which seems to be a great idea. The network get's more security, the coin more exposure and the humble internet surfer no ads! It does however open up other forms of centralization. Big sites implementing these methods would indirectly control a bigger portion of the hashrate. Not only this, but the mining is open for malware implementation. Why not infect some office pc's with a miner directed at your Vertcoin address? Or to go full doom and gloom, what about a double spend botnet attack on the network?
These concerns are not that pressing today, we can enjoy and celebrate our achievements for now. But soon we need to get back to it. Start mining everyone and start thinking about how we can protect the network form these risks! Lastly, create awareness among other investors how easy and important it is to mine! The added bonus is of course, the more people mine, the less tempted they are to buy in and get out at a profit!
EDIT:
People, this is all about healthy discussion. Don't downvote opinion you don't agree with, upvote the whole debate if you think the subject is important.
submitted by HashedEgg to vertcoin [link] [comments]

New to /r/Hashgraph? Please read this post first! [FAQ & Resource Links]

Welcome to the official Hashgraph subreddit. Hashgraph is a data structure and consensus algorithm that is faster, fairer, and more secure than blockchain.
Please find our FAQ and a directory of resources below.
 
#GENERAL FAQ#
1: How does it work?
Hashgraph uses two special techniques (1) Gossip about Gossip and (2) Virtual Voting to achieve fast, fair and secure consensus.
Gossip is a well-known computer science term, which can be defined as calling any random node and telling that node everything you know, that it does not know. In distributed ledger technology, the “baseline” or minimum bandwidth required is that the transactions go to every node. A gossip protocol can achieve this transfer of information / syncing process exponentially fast. Gossip about Gossip refers to attaching a small additional amount of information to this Gossip / transaction payload, which are two hashes containing the last two people talked to (hence, gossiping about the information gossiped). Using this information, a Hashgraph can be built and constantly updated as more information is gossiped, on each node.
Once the Hashgraph is built, it is extremely easy to know what a node would vote, because we know what each node knows, and when they knew it. We now can use this data as an input to a 30 year old voting algorithm (which have strong security guarantees, maths proofs of being Asynchronous Byzantine Fault Tolerant but typically lack the speed necessary for real world implementation), and know which transactions have reached consensus quickly.
The result of using this methodology is that we get the benefit of 30 year old voting algorithms which have have strong math proofs of being Asynchronous Byzantine Fault Tolerant (meaning that we know when we will achieve consensus, guaranteed, and our math proofs make no assumptions about the speed of the internet, due to firewalls, ddos attacks, viruses or botnets), speed (due to use of a gossip protocol) and fair ordering and time stamping on every event.
2: How is Hashgraph different?
There are five different approaches to reaching distributed consensus. Firstly we have Proof-of-Work, which started with Bitcoin. The second is leader-based systems like PBFT, Raft, and Paxos. Then there is economy-based, commonly referred to as Proof-of-Stake, where forgers stake cryptocurrency on votes in order to reach consensus. Then, there’s voting-based which are too slow to be used in real systems. Finally there’s Hashgraph, which uses virtual voting and is incredibly efficient because it does not actually send any votes over the internet.
3: What is bank-grade consensus?
Hashgraph is the only bank-grade consensus algorithm as a result of the following properties: Mathematical proof of asynchronous Byzantine fault tolerance; Resilience to DDoS attacks, network partitions, sybil attacks and firewall/virus attacks; and Mathematical proof of fairness of ordering, access, and timestamps.
4: Is there a cryptocurrency?
Hashgraph is not currently available on a public network / ledger so there is no cryptocurrency at this time. We have not yet announced our plans for a public ledger, but please stay tuned for updates.
5: Why is Hashgraph patented?
Hashgraph is currently only available on a private network so its patents allow for market advantage in enterprise / commercial applications. This is not designed to stifle creativity or expansion of the emerging ecosystem, but to protect technological innovations that took years to develop.
6: How do I use Hashgraph?
If you want to use Hashgraph on a private network, you can apply for an enterprise / commercial license by contacting Swirlds.
7: What is the different between Hashgraph and Swirlds?
Hashgraph is the technology. Swirlds is the organization responsible for handling the licensing of Hashgraph.
8: Is Hashgraph better than blockchain?
The pitching of Hashgraph against Blockchain is a sensationalist angle that we do not endorse. While we do have some advantages over Blockchain based consensus, our intention is not at all to diminish the significance of Blockchain technology. We consider Blockchain to be like a capable older brother who graciously paved the way by bringing the power of Distributed Ledger Technology to the light of day, for which we are very grateful. Articles, talks etc pitching us against Blockchain are not written by us, nor are we generally consulted before articles go live. There is no reason that blockchain and Hashgraph couldn’t live together. While it is true that we have won some enterprise use cases against Blockchain based solutions (CULedger & Swirlds launch Hashgraph technology partnership), blockchain has a massive network effect which we definitely admire and respect. We respect and value the work and efforts of all developers and scientists in the Blockchain space. We also understand that Hashgraph is less well-known and nascent. That being said, every great movement has to start from somewhere and if you are reading this, it has potentially (hopefully) started with you too.
9: How can I get involved?
If you want to contact us for support or participation, please reach out to [email protected]. You can find more informational resources on the website homepage, where you can also sign up to our mailing list and/or follow us on social media. The Hashgraph Community Telegram Channel is also a great place to ask technical questions.
 
SPEED
10: How fast is Hashgraph?
It’s fast. Very fast. But you don’t have to trust us. We will release formal performance results soon, and at the same time provide the software you can use to validate the results for yourself.
Simply providing the number of transactions per second is meaningless unless all of the details are provided as well: number of nodes, bandwidth, latency, CPU, size of transaction, etc. Our performance results will provide the details needed to characterize results for a range of settings.
11: Does Hashgraph have transaction fees?
Instead of some small subset of participants being responsible for validating transactions and adding to the ledger (like miners in blockchain), all nodes contribute. Consequently, there is less need to incentivize through fees. Transaction fees are therefore expected to be very small, thereby making Hashgraph viable for micropayments.
 
SECURITY
12: What are the major security risks of distributed ledger technologies?
For a DLT, the security risks are an attacker:
13: Where do the main security risks originate?
The security risks specific to DLTs come from both internal and external attacks. An internal threat can include a computer in the network that is infected with a virus or worm other malware, or is run by a malicious party, or honest corporation that has a malicious insider with access to the computer.
An external threat can include a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, where the attacker floods one or more computers with enough messages to temporarily shut it down. Another external attack is if an adversary owns a firewall surrounding some of the nodes in the network, which it can use to block or delay messages.
14: What is Byzantine Fault Tolerance (BFT)?
There are a variety of consensus algorithms and each offer different features and characteristics. A consensus algorithm is characterized as BFT if it guarantees a moment in time where all participants reach consensus, know that consensus has been reached, and they are never wrong. This can be contrasted with consensus algorithms based on PoW, where participants slowly become more and more confident that consensus is near, but may still not be correct. There are different levels of BFT, depending on the sorts of assumptions made about the network and transmission of messages. The strongest type of BFT is asynchronous BFT. Hashgraph is unique in supporting highest degree of BFT while still being very efficient.
15: What is Asynchronous BFT?
When a system is asynchronous BFT, it allows for malicious actors controlling the network, deleting or slowing down messages of their choosing. The only assumption made is that less than ⅓ are attackers, and some messages eventually get transmitted over the internet. Some systems are partially asynchronous, which are secure only if the attackers do not have too much power and do not manipulate the timing of messages too much. For instance, a partially asynchronous system could prove Byzantine under the assumption that messages get passed over the internet in ten seconds. This assumption ignores the reality of botnets, distributed denial of service attacks, and malicious firewalls. If unable to meet the criteria of asynchronous BFT, it is preferable that they be asynchronous less-than-Byzantine, rather than less-than-asynchronous Byzantine. In other words, they should prove they are somewhat secure in the real world instead of proving they are very secure in a fantasy world.
16: How does Hashgraph prevent Sybil attacks?
A Sybil attack refers to an attempt to compromise a network through the creation of large numbers of spurious identities – these are directed to act in collusion to inappropriately impact the network. Sybil attacks are a particular concern for public DLTs in which no special permissions are required to become a node. Protection against Sybil attacks can be provided by appropriately allocating and weighting votes of different nodes. Hashgraph can be deployed in a number of different vote weighting models, e.g. votes could be weighted by a node’s stake in some currency, or its ability to perform some work, or its willingness to risk some value. A more detailed explanation can be found at here.
17: How does Hashgraph prevent DDoS attacks?
A Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack occurs when it is possible to disrupt the flow of transactions for the entire network by targeting a single or a few computers. Different DLTs vary in their vulnerability to DDoS. Leader-based systems give special permissions to a particular node and are highly susceptible because the current leader is a bottleneck and is vulnerable to being targeted in the DDoS. Even if the role of the leader rotates amongst nodes, other nodes necessarily know the current leader, and so could direct a DDoS. PoW systems are resilient to DDoS because it’s difficult to predict which miner will solve the inverse hash and publish a block. Consequently, the attacker would not know which miner should be targeted. Hashgraph doesn’t use PoW, but neither does it have a Leader. So Hashgraph provides DDoS resilience without the inefficiency and cost of PoW.
 
FAIRNESS
18: What is fairness?
Fairness refers to the ability of DLTs to prevent the ordering of transactions from being unduly manipulated. Hashgraph is fair in that it serializes all transactions with cryptographic timestamping, unlike blockchains where miners determine the order in which transactions are placed within each block. In certain use cases, the transaction order is important. Consider for instance two different people purchasing shares in a stock – the first order to go through will likely get a cheaper price. Hashgraph orders transactions according to the median timestamp of when the population of nodes received them – thereby ensuring they are recorded fairly.
 
SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT KIT (SDK)
19: How can I get started developing applications?
Download the SDK and follow the instructions detailed included in the /docs folder, or visit our online version here.
In order to develop a commercial application on Hashgraph using the Swirlds SDK, you will need to contact Swirlds to discuss the appropriate licensing that is required. However, you do not need to ask for permission before downloading the SDK to build small scale, non-commercial applications for personal use and experiment.
20: Why is the platform and SDK written in Java?
Java is a general purpose programming language with a large open source ecosystem and resources for developer support. There are also advantageous security measures in the Java development environment, such as sandboxing, that will allow the platform in the future to run untrusted applications, while protecting the user and their hard drive from those applications.
21: Can I develop applications in other languages?
In addition to Java, we also want the option for developers who would like to develop in other programming languages, such as Python or JavaScript. This is part of the Hashgraph development roadmap.
22: Is there a Developer Chat?
Yes, currently it is on Telegram, but will be likely moving to a new place, as our community sees fit.
 
Main links:
Whitepapers / Technical Documents:
Articles & News:
Videos:
Audios:
Hashgraph Social Links:
For general enquiries please email: [email protected]
submitted by ollybolton to hashgraph [link] [comments]

Proper Care & Feeding of your CryptoLocker Infection: A rundown on what we know.

This article is no longer being maintained, please see the new version here. Thanks.
tl;dr: I hope you have backups. It's legit, it really encrypts. It can jump across mapped network drives and encrypt anything with write access, and infection isn't dependent on being a local admin or UAC state. Most antiviruses do not catch it until the damage is done. The timer is real and your opportunity to pay them goes away when it lapses. You can pay them with a GreenDot MoneyPak or 2 Bitcoins, attempt to restore a previous version using ShadowExplorer, go to a backup, or be SOL.
Vectors: In order of likelihood, the vectors of infection have been:
  • Email attachments: A commonly reported subject is Payroll Report. The attachment, most of the time, is a zip with a PDF inside, which is actually an executable.
  • PCs that are unwitting members of the Zeus botnet have had the virus pushed to them directly.
  • There is currently one report of an infection through Java, using the .jnlp file as a dropper to load the executable.
Variants: The current variant demands $300 via GreenDot MoneyPak or 2 BTC. I will not attempt to thoroughly monitor the price of bitcoins for this thread, use Mt. Gox for the current exchange rate. Currently the MoneyPak is the cheaper option, but last week Bitcoins were. Two variants, including a $100 variant and a $300 that did not offer Bitcoin, are defunct.
Payload: The virus stores a public RSA 2048-bit key in the local registry, and goes to a C&C server for a private key which is never stored. The technical nuts and bolts have been covered by Fabian from Emsisoft here. It will use a mix of RSA 2048-bit and AES 256-bit encryption on files matching these masks:
*.odt, *.ods, *.odp, *.odm, *.odc, *.odb, *.doc, *.docx, *.docm, *.wps, *.xls, *.xlsx, *.xlsm, *.xlsb, *.xlk, *.ppt, *.pptx, *.pptm, *.mdb, *.accdb, *.pst, *.dwg, *.dxf, *.dxg, *.wpd, *.rtf, *.wb2, *.mdf, *.dbf, *.psd, *.pdd, *.eps, *.ai, *.indd, *.cdr, ????????.jpg, ????????.jpe, img_*.jpg, *.dng, *.3fr, *.arw, *.srf, *.sr2, *.bay, *.crw, *.cr2, *.dcr, *.kdc, *.erf, *.mef, *.mrw, *.nef, *.nrw, *.orf, *.raf, *.raw, *.rwl, *.rw2, *.r3d, *.ptx, *.pef, *.srw, *.x3f, *.der, *.cer, *.crt, *.pem, *.pfx, *.p12, *.p7b, *.p7c, *.pdf, *.tif
This list of file masks may be incomplete. Trust this list at your peril. When in doubt, CryptoLocker will show you what files it has encrypted by clicking the relevant link in the virus's message.
It will access mapped network drives that the current user has write access to and encrypt those. It will not attack server shares, only mapped drives. Current reports are unclear as to how much permission is needed for the virus to encrypt a mapped drive, and if you have clarification or can test in a VM please notify me via message.
By the time the notification pops up, it's already encrypted everything. It's silent until the job is done.
Many antiviruses have been reported as not catching the virus until it's too late, including MSE, Trend Micro WFBS, Eset, GFI Vipre, and Kaspersky. They can further complicate matters by reverting registry changes and removing the executables, leaving the files behind without a public or private key. Releasing the files from quarantine does work, as does releasing the registry keys added and downloading another sample of the virus.
Windows XP through 8 have all reported infections.
What's notable about this virus, and this is going to lead to a lot of tough decisions, is that paying them to decrypt the files actually does work, so long as their C&C server is up. They verify the money transfer manually and then push a notification for the infected machine to call home for the private key again, which it uses to decrypt. It takes a long time to decrypt, at the rate of roughly 5GB/hr based on forum reports. The virus uses the registry to maintain a list of files and paths, so not moving the files around is vital to decryption if you are paying them.
Also notable is that the timer it gives you to pay them does appear to be legitimate, as multiple users have reported that once the timer ran out, the program uninstalled itself. Reinfecting the machine does not bring a new timer. I was not able to verify the uninstallation of the program after the timer ran out, it appears to be dependent on internet access.
Due to the nature of the encryption, brute-forcing a decrypt is essentially impossible for now.
Removal: Removing the virus itself is trivial, but no antivirus product (or any product, for that matter), will be able to decrypt the files until the private key is found.
File Recovery: There are only a handful of options for recovering encrypted files, and they all rely on either having System Restore/VSS turned on or having a backup disconnected from the infected machine. Cloud backup solutions without versioning are no good against this as they will commit the encrypted files to the cloud.
I had a Carbonite employee message me regarding my earlier statement that Carbonite is no good against this virus. It turns out that versioning is included in all Carbonite plans and support all agent OSes except Mac OS X which is outside the scope of this thread anyway. They have the ability to do a mass reversion of files, but you must call tech support and upon mentioning CryptoLocker you will be escalated to a tier 3 tech. They do not mention this ability on the site due to the potential for damage a mass reversion could do if done inadvertently. These are my own findings, independent of what the employee told me. Crashplan and other versioning-based backup solutions such as SonicWALL CDP should also work fine provided the backups are running normally.
Using the "Previous Versions" tab of the file properties is a cheap test, and has had mixed results. Using ShadowExplorer on Vista-8 will give you a much easier graphical frontend for restoring large amounts of files at once (though this will not help with mapped drives, you'd need to run it on the server in that case). Undelete software doesn't work as it encrypts the files in place on the hard drive, there is no copying going on. The big takeaway is that cold-storage backups are good, and they will make this whole process laughably easy to resolve.
Prevention: As this post has attracted many home users, I'll put at the top that MalwareBytes Pro, Avast! Free and Avast! Pro (defs 131016-0 16.10.2013 or later) will prevent the virus from running.
For sysadmins in a domain environment, one way to prevent this and many other viruses is to set up software restriction policies (SRPs) to disallow the executing of .exe files from AppData/Roaming. Grinler explains how to set up the policy here.
Visual example. The rule covering %AppData%\*\*.exe is necessary for the current variant. The SRP will apply to domain admins after either the GP timer hits or a reboot, gpupdate /force does not enforce it immediately. There is almost no collateral damage to the SRP. Dropbox and Chrome are not effected. Spotify may be affected, not sure. I don't use it.
Making shares read-only will mitigate the risk of having sensitive data on the server encrypted.
Forecast: The reports of infections have risen from ~1,300 google results for cryptolocker to over 150,000 in a month. This virus is really ugly, really efficient, and really hard to stop until it's too late. It's also very successful in getting people to pay, which funds the creation of a new variant that plugs what few holes have been found. I don't like where this is headed.
Some edits below are now redundant, but many contain useful information.
9/17 EDIT: All 9/17 edits are now covered under Prevention.
10/10 EDIT: Google matches for CryptoLocker are up 40% in the last week, and I'm getting 5-10 new posts a day on this thread, so I thought I'd update it with some interesting finds from fellow Redditors.
  • soulscore reports that setting the BIOS clock back in time added time to his cryptolocker ransom. Confirmed that the timer extends with the machine offline, but that may be cosmetic and I don't like your chances of this actually helping if your timer runs out on the server side.
  • Spinal33 reports that AV companies are catching up with CryptoLocker and are blocking websites that are spawned in the virus's domain generation algorithm. This effectively means that some people are locked out of the ability to even pay the ransom. (Technically they could, but the virus couldn't call home.)
  • Malwarebytes is claiming that MBAM Pro will catch CryptoLocker. If someone wants to test them on it, be my guest. Confirmed
  • CANT_ARGUE_DAT_LOGIC gave some insight on the method the virus uses when choosing what to infect. It simply goes through folders alphabetically and encrypts all files that match the filemasks towards the top of this post. If you are lucky enough to catch it in the act of encrypting and pull the network connection, the CryptoLocker message will pop up immediately and the countdown will begin. Helpful in determining what will need to be taken into account for decryption.
EDIT 2: We had a customer that ignored our warning email get infected so I will have my hands on an infected PC today, hope to have some useful info to bring back.
10/10 MEGA EDIT: I now have an active CryptoLocker specimen on my bench. I want to run down some things I've found:
  • On WinXP at least, the nested SRP rule is necessary to prevent infection. The path rule needs to be %AppData%\*\*.exe
  • An alternate link to the virus sample is http://gktibioivpqbot.net/1002.exe
  • Once the program runs it spawns two more executables with random names in %userprofile%. Adding a SRP to cover %userprofile%\*.exe may be desired, though this will prevent GoToMyPC from running at a bare minimum.
  • This user was a local administrator, and CryptoLocker was able to encrypt files in other user's directories, though it did not spawn the executables anywhere but the user that triggered the infection. When logged in under a different account there is no indication that a timer is running.
  • The environment has server shares but no mapped drives and the shared data was not touched, even though a desktop shortcut would've taken the virus to a share. I suspect that will be covered in the next iteration.
  • The list of masks above does not appear to be totally complete. PDF files were encrypted and were not originally part of the set of file masks. That is the only exception I noticed, everything else follows the list. Conveniently (/s), CryptoLocker has a button you can click that shows the list of files it's encrypted.
  • The current ransom is $300 by MoneyPak or 2BTC, which at the time of writing would be $280 and change.
  • Fabian reported that registry data is stored at HKCU/Software/CryptoLocker. I cannot glean the meaning of the DWORD values on files but I do notice they are unique, likely salts for the individual files. I'm curious what purpose that would serve if the private key was revealed as the salts would be useless.
  • I have confirmed the message soulscore left that setting the BIOS timer back a few hours adds an equal amount of time. No telling whether that will work once it has a network connection and can see the C&C server, though.
  • The virus walked right through an up-to-date version of GFI Vipre. It appears AV companies either consider the risk too low to update definitions or, more likely, they're having trouble creating heuristic patterns that don't cause a lot of collateral damage.
10/11 EDIT: I ran Daphne on the infected PC to get a better idea of what might be going on. lsass.exe is running like crazy. Computer's had it's CPU pegged all day. I noticed the primary executable running from %AppData% has a switch on the end of the run command, which in my case is /w000000EC. No idea what that means.
10/15 EDIT: I just wanted to thank all the redditors that have submitted information on this. I have some interesting new developments that I'll be editing in full tomorrow.
10/18 EDIT: Hello arstechnica! Please read through comments before posting a question as there's a very good chance it's been answered.
New developments since 10/15:
  • We have confirmation that both Malwarebytes Antimalware Pro and Avast Free and Pro will stop CryptoLocker from running. My personal choice of the two is MBAM Pro but research on your own, AV Comparatives is a wonderful resource.
  • We have reports of a new vector of infection, Java. This is hardly surprising as Zeus was already being transmitted in this fashion, but Maybe_Forged reports contracting the virus with a honeypot VM in this manner.
  • zfs_balla made a hell of a first post on reddit, giving us a lot of insight to the behavior of the decryption process, and answered a frequently-asked question. I'm paraphrasing below.
A file encrypted twice and decrypted once is still garbage.
The waiting for payment confirmation screen stayed up for 16 days before a decryption began, so don't lose hope if it's been up a while.
The DWORD values in the registry have no bearing on decryption. Renaming an encrypted file to one on the list in the registry will decrypt it. However, I would presume this would only work for files that the virus encrypted on that machine as the public key is different with every infection.
Adding any new matching files to somewhere the virus has access will cause them to be encrypted, even at the "waiting for payment confirmation" screen. Be careful.
Hitting "Cancel" on a file that can't be found doesn't cancel the entire decryption, just that file.
EDIT 2: I've rewritten the bulk of this post so people don't have to slog through edits for important information.
10/21 EDIT: Two noteworthy edits. One is regarding Carbonite, which is apparently a viable backup option for this, it is covered under File Recovery. The other is regarding a piece of software called CryptoPrevent. I have not tried it, but according to the developer's website it blocks %localappdata%\*.exe and %localappdata%\*\*.exe which is not necessary for the current variant and will inflict quite a bit of collateral damage. I have no reason right now to doubt the legitimacy of the program, but be aware of the tradeoffs going in.
I'm now at the 15000 character limit. Wat do?
submitted by bluesoul to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Blowing the lid off the CryptoNote/Bytecoin scam (with the exception of Monero) - Reformatted for Reddit

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
.
Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
.
See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
.
May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
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pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
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This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

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